REVIEW: Lady Bird flies high as Greta Gerwig makes directorial debut

The most charming aspect about Lady Bird is the idea that there is no great twist or typical structure to the movie, but instead is a catalogue of engaging moments.

Greta Gerwig’s directorial debut is a refreshing blend of her quirky, indie roots and commercial, mainstream familiarities which is roughly based on her own story. Yet Lady Bird is also a film that everyone can relate to and enjoy whether they are male or female and regardless of age.

The brilliant Saoirse Ronan plays Christine “Lady Bird” McPherson, a teenager growing up in Sacramento in 2002. Throughout the movie we follow her journey through the late stages of a Catholic school, her first exploits with the opposite sex, and her general coming of age growing up in a family struggling financially. Most importantly though, we are introduced to the incredibly strained relationship with her mother (Laurie Metcalf), summed up in the opening scene of the movie.

It is this relationship that is the backbone of the movie, and Metcalf is the perfect counter to Ronan’s punchy character. It seems like it will be a shootout between Metcalf and Kristin Scott Thomas (Darkest Hour) for Best Supporting Actress. Special mention must also go to Tracy Metts who plays Lady Bird’s gentle, depressed father.

Gerwig tells this story so genuinely and honestly that it is so relatable for so many people who would have had similar struggles at that stage of their lives. Yet there is a quirky teenage charm to it all that is very much down to her and the movie’s cast who are all on top form. Lady Bird guarantees laughs and tears, but will leave you with an overwhelming feeling of melancholic warmth.

 

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